Preparing the pasture for the horses and cows

fencingThe little bottle-feeder cows we picked up a few months ago are really starting to fill out. We have completely weened them from the bottle and have been eating just hay for about a month now. With that being the case, it’s time to get them out to pasture.

A few weeks back our neighbour had rented a post pounder for a long weekend. He had  mentioned that he’d only need it for a day at the most and if we wanted to do any fencing, we were welcome to use it as part of the same rental. Sweet! The entire fence on the front of our property was in really rough shape (missing posts, most of wire gone) and we also wanted to get some cross fencing done so we can use our land to feed some of our animals.

The horses are really loving all the open space they now have
The horses are really loving all the open space they now have

So I helped my neighbour with his fence  posts and he, along with my father-in-law, helped put in the fence posts for all of the fencing that we had wanted to do. That was a few weeks maybe even a month ago.

Fast forward to last week: time to finish off the fence. Part of the process was simply stringing and stretching the wire and part of it was to install two gates that we were given and were trying to re-use. Gates are expensive and when someone is just throwing them out; it seems a shame to just let them get tossed. I’ve had this sitting our land for about a year, and it’s great to actually have them put to use.

Lately we’ve had a whole lot of rain here (5 inches in just over a week) and that made for some boggy conditions for fencing. With the quad it wasn’t too bad, but with the bobcat, that things was getting stuck like crazy. Especially with the post auger installed. I ended up having to get quite creative with how I installed the first gate. Working alone usually leads to some interesting/hill-billy solutions.

Getting creative with machines, slings and come-alongs. The joys of working alone...
Getting creative with machines, slings and come-alongs. The joys of working alone…

But, after a concentrated effort last week (I was shocked it took the better part of a week) it’s great to have the cows and horses running around and grazing in the newly fenced pasture.

Here’s a little video from our YouTube channel about it. Cheers!

Our First Giveaway!

win this handmade knifeWell, to get things moving further over on the youtube channel, I have decided to give away a handmade knife. We haven’t really shared much on the knife-making front here the blog, but it does happen and it happens fairly often. What started as a hobby and a way for me to have all the knives I wanted without having to drain the bank (knife collecting can be an expensive habit) has turned into a fun little side hustle that is starting to gain some momentum. It was about 3 years ago that I tried making my first knife, and since then they have steadily been getting better.

I’ve started to sell a few here and there and I am now getting orders for one-off custom knives from collectors in the United States. It feels nice to have people want and appreciate things that you make by hand. Anyway, I did a video on making a bushcraft knife and showed all the steps involved. That video is here:

Part of the reason for making that blade was so that I could have that exact knife to use as a giveaway once the SLL youtube channel reaches 2000 subscribers. We’re at just over 430 now so it’s a bit of a ways to go, but I think that it’s a fairly attainable goal. Especially if we can keep putting up half decent content for people to watch. There are tons of channels on YouTube that have multi-thousands of subscribers, and some in the millions, so really, 2000 is not by any means a big YouTube channel, but I think it’s a pretty decent start. Anyway, here’s the announcement video of the contest. Make sure to subscribe, and comment on the video that I will put up once we reach 2000 subscribers and you could win this knife!